What is PCI?

What is PCI?

A: The Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) is a set of requirements designed to ensure that ALL companies that process, store or transmit credit card information maintain a secure environment. Essentially any merchant that has a Merchant ID (MID).

The Payment Card Industry Security Standards Council (PCI SSC) was launched on September 7, 2006 to manage the ongoing evolution of the Payment Card Industry (PCI) security standards with focus on improving payment account security throughout the transaction process. The PCI DSS is administered and managed by the PCI SSC (www.pcisecuritystandards.org), an independent body that was created by the major payment card brands (Visa, MasterCard, American Express, Discover and JCB.).

It is important to note, the payment brands and acquirers are responsible for enforcing compliance, not the PCI council.

The major credit card issuers created PCI (Payment Card Industry) compliance standards to protect personal information and ensure security when transactions are processed using a payment card. All members of the payment card industry (financial institutions, credit card companies and merchants) must comply with these standards if they want to accept credit cards. Failure to meet compliance standards can result in fines from credit card companies and banks and even the loss of the ability to process credit cards.

There are six categories of PCI standards that must be met in order for a retailer to be deemed compliant.

Protect Cardholder Data

This category focuses on how cardholder data is stored and transmitted. Business owners that choose to store cardholder information have an obligation to protect that data. Protecting information means that not everyone can access it. Businesses that store actual credit card numbers will often store them as encrypted data, so that even if someone got access to the database they still could not decipher the information in it.

Ecommerce businesses need to be especially critical of the way that cardholder data is transmitted. When a customer makes a purchase on a website, his/her cardholder information is sent across the Internet. During that transmission, cardholder data must be encrypted with at least a 128 bit SSL certificate in order to meet this standard.

Maintain a Vulnerability Management Program

This one is relatively simple, and translates to keeping up to date with your systems. Vulnerability exposure can be minimized by regularly updating computer hardware, operating systems and software. Keeping up to date anti-virus software, as well as running regular virus scans, is another requirement to meet this standard if your systems are susceptible to such vulnerabilities.

Implement Strong Access Control Measures

The most exploited breach in security is the human element, which is harder to protect. Part of meeting PCI compliance means limiting access to cardholder data to only those persons that need to use it. In addition to restricting physical access to cardholder information, business owners are also responsible for assigning a unique identification to each person that does have access.

Regularly Monitor and Test Networks

Networks that store cardholder data be monitored and tested regularly. Regular scans of security measures and processes, monitoring and tracking of network access to cardholder data are required to satisfy this standard. Consider signing up for a security testing and auditing service, such as ScanAlert’s Hacker Safe program, which can help you to identify and fix potential security problems as they arise.

Maintain an Information Security Policy

Considering that humans are generally the easiest part of a system to hack, and also that ignorance does not relieve liability, it’s important to draft and implement a company-wide information security policy. Make sure that your employees know and understand their responsibilities with regards to cardholder data before it becomes an issue.

The first step in PCI compliance is to meet the above standards. Credit card companies and financial institutions validate that vendors are abiding by the regulations, giving them ratings based on their volume of transactions. The rating that a company receives determines the process that they must go through in order to be validated. Next month, we’ll take a look at the four validation ratings, and what each rating means to a company.


icon-pageFor Your convenience, please download PCI FAQ.

 

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